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More proof federal ‘protection’ increases vandalism to antiquities


August 18, 2016

On August 10 the National Parks Service posted the following notice indicating a ‘dramatic’ rise in vandalism to the petroglyphs and other antiquities within the boundaries of Capitol Reef National Park in Utah.

Do Not Write on the Rocks: It is Illegal

Date: August 10, 2016
Contact: Scott Brown, (435) 425- 4130
A dramatic rise in the number of graffiti incidents is occurring in areas throughout the park including in Capitol Gorge, Grand Wash, Hickman Bridge, Cassidy Arch Trail and most recently at the Highway Petroglyph Site. The Highway Petroglyph Site is one of the premier visitor highlights within the park and is visited by thousands of people every year. This site is located along Highway 24 and is easily accessible to park visitors wanting to view and experience these irreplaceable Native American writings known as petroglyphs. Modern pueblo groups call these people Hisatsinom, people of long ago. To the Paiute Tribe, they are known as the Nengwoots, the People Who Lived the Old Ways. They inhabited the Capitol Reef area from about 250 to 1275 C.E. (Common Era). Archeologists named them the Fremont Culture for the Fremont River where they were first studied. A panel at the Highway Petroglyph Site in the park was defaced with the words “Ivan Dallas TX”, “Henn/Hena”, and “DALLAS TX”. The writing appears in the dark patina next to the prehistoric images known as the bear and coyote and on top of a bighorn sheep image. Leah McGinnis, Park Superintendent stated that “Restoring these archeological sites and geologic features after deliberate vandalism is a complex, difficult process, and not always possible. Once damage occurs at these remarkable works of art they can never be fully repaired.”

Under the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), these acts of vandalism are illegal and are punishable by up to 2 years in prison and/or a $20,000 fine. Help us spread the word and let others know that these activities are illegal. Anyone with information concerning the vandalism at the Highway Petroglyph Site or other areas within the park should immediately contact the National Park Service at 435-425- 4135, or the Archeological Resource Protection Act Hotline at 800-227- 7286.

This notice is more proof that federal ‘protection’ of lands, resources and natural treasures, protects nothing, and actually exposes them to destruction due to vast numbers of human visitors.

Obama’s possible setting aside of 1.9 million acres in San Juan County, Utah, using the Antiquities of Act, is being hotly debated throughout the state. The president, and his environmentalist Interior Secretary, Sally Jewell, at the urging of elite environmentalists and outdoor clothing and gear corporations, have announced a plan to create a massive new national monument. The proposed Bears Ears National Monument, would be established immediately to the east of Canyonlands National Park and the Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument. A new national monument would lock up the vast majority of lands in southern Utah, forever, prohibiting economic development and driving out existing industries and the communities which depend upon them. Supplanting the agriculture, energy production, and other regional economic drivers would be tourism–and of course–National Parks Service jobs.

When a diverse economy is replaced with a tourism-centric model, millions of tourists and millions upon millions of tourist dollars are required to fill the void. Ironically, the Antiquities Act was created over a century ago to protect, on a temporary basis and within a limited geographical area, actual cultural antiquities. The reality today is that the Antiquities Act is being used to gobble up countless acres (nearly 300 million under Obama, thus far), placing them under complete federal control, and creating monochromatic–unstable and unreliable–tourism-based economies. The influx of millions of tourists puts pressure on local resources; water, energy, etc., and ‘dramatically’ degrades, erodes, and yes, attracts ‘social-medial celebrity’ vandals to the antiquities which should be protected. THIS is the ugly downside of federal control of special lands and resources.

In recent years, instances of vandalism in many national parks and monuments have skyrocketed, not to mention the wear and tear of foot, bike, and tourist coach traffic crisscrossing these ‘special lands.’

Graffiti Capitol Reef National Park

Graffiti Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef vandalism

Capitol Reef vandalism

Graffiti over petroglyphs Capitol Reef National Park

Graffiti over petroglyphs Capitol Reef National Park

arch-graffiti_damage_nps_600

Etched graffiti Arches National Park

Vandalism Saguaro National Park

Vandalism Saguaro National Park

 

Etched graffiti Joshua Tree National Park

Etched graffiti Joshua Tree National Park

joshuatreevandalism

Painted graffiti Joshua Tree National Park


Graffiti Joshua Tree National Park

Graffiti Joshua Tree National Park

Vandalism Joshua Tree National Park

Vandalism Joshua Tree National Park

Vandalism Angeles National Forest

Vandalism Angeles National Forest

Vandalism Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Vandalism Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Vandalism Rocky Mountain National Park

Vandalism Rocky Mountain National Park

Posted by Reagangirl.com  8/18/16


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