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Keeping the public out of public lands: BLM commandments, a litany of “Thou Shalt Not’s”


As originally published by The Petroglyph

Final Outrageous BLM Rules for Moab and Monticello Utah field office Areas

Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands Managed by the Moab and Monticello Field Offices in Grand and San Juan Counties, UT

areaclosed

The following information was taken from the Federal Register Notice on the final rules. These final steps go beyond real management and will lead to limited use of BLM lands in the Moab and Monticello Field Offices boundaries. In turn it will limit small business uses, public uses, grazing and recreation.  This is not just going to affect the evil ATVer, but also all those with horses, dogs, hikers, hunters, and everyone that uses the governments lands.

This is just one more example show why the land needs to be transferred back to the state.  People need to wake up to the threat we are facing in rural america today.  These new rules are nothing more than one more step towards the accomplishment of the socialistic agenda towards world communism and the destruction of Individual Rights.  The mere idea of public lands supports this agenda and now these new rules re-enforce it.

Here is the break down………

Monticello Field Office

Unless otherwise authorized, on all public lands administered by the BLM-Monticello Field Office:Show citation box

(1) You must not camp in archaeological sites posted as closed to camping.

(2) You must not enter archaeological sites posted as closed to the public.

(3) You must not use ropes or other climbing aids to access archaeological sites, unless operating under a permit.

(4) You must not bring domestic pets or pack animals to archaeological sites, posted as closed to the public.

(5) You must not operate a motorized or mechanized vehicle on any route, trail, or area not designated as open to such use by a BLM sign, a BLM map, or the Monticello Field Office Travel Management Plan.

(6) You must not ignite or maintain a campfire within the canyons in the Dark Canyon SRMA or White Canyon SRMA.    Wait until you read what the SRMA covers….

Moab Field Office

Unless otherwise authorized, on all public lands within the BLM-Moab Field Office jurisdiction:

(1) You must not burn wood pallets.

(2) You must not camp in archaeological sites posted as closed to camping.

(3) You must not camp in historic sites posted as closed to camping.

(4) You must not operate a motorized or mechanized vehicle on any route, trail, or area not designated as open to such use by a BLM sign, a BLM map, or the Moab Field Office Travel Management Plan.

The following rules apply only to the enumerated areas:

(5) You must not gather petrified wood in the following two areas:

i. The Colorado Riverway SRMA; and

ii. High visitation sites within the Labyrinth Rim/Gemini Bridges SRMA.

(6) You must not possess or use glass beverage containers in the following areas:

i. Moab Canyon Sand Hill within sections 20 and 21 of Township 25 South, Range 21 East, Salt Lake Meridian; and

ii. Powerhouse Lane Trailhead, Lower Mill Creek, and the North Fork of Mill Creek for a distance of one mile from the trailhead at Powerhouse Lane within sections 3, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10 of Township 26 South, Range 22 East, Salt Lake Meridian.

(7) You must not camp at a non-designated site.

(8) You must not ignite or maintain a campfire at a non-designated site.

(9) You must not dispose of human waste in any container other than a portable toilet.

(10) You must not gather wood.

Rules 7, 8, 9 and 10 apply to lands within one half mile of the following roads:

i. Utah Highway 313;

ii. The Island in the Sky entrance road between Utah Highway 313 and Canyonlands;

iii. The Gemini Bridges Route (Grand County Road No. 118) and the spur route into Bride Canyon within section 24, Township 25 South, Range 20 East, Salt Lake Meridian; and

iv. The Kane Springs Creek Canyon Rim route from U.S. Highway 191 to where it first crosses the eastern boundary of section 20, Township 27 South, Range 22 East, Salt Lake Meridian, exclusive of the State and private land west of Blue Hill in sections 25, 26, 35, and 36.

Rules 7, 8, 9 and 10 also apply to the following:

v. Lands within Long Canyon (Grand County Road No. 135) coincident with a portion of the Colorado Riverway SRMA and the BLM lands within Dead Horse Point State Park.

vi. Lands along both sides of U.S. Highway 191 bounded by Arches National Park on the east, private lands in Moab Valley on the south, the Union Pacific Railroad Potash Rail Spur on the west, and private and state land near the lower Gemini Bridges Trailhead on the north.

vii. Lands located between the upper end of the Nefertiti Rapid parking area in section 1, Township 19 South, Range 16 East, Salt Lake Meridian, along the shoreline of the Green River on the east side of the river to Swaseys Take-Out in section 3, Township 20 South, Range 16 East, Salt Lake Meridian. This includes all public lands between Nefertiti and Swaseys along Grand County Road No. 154.

viii. Lands including Castle Rock, Ida Gulch, Professor Valley, Mary Jane Canyon, and the upper Onion Creek areas that are south of the Colorado Riverway SRMA, below the rims of Adobe and Fisher Mesas, and west of the private land in Fisher Valley.

ix. Lands along the Potash Trail (Grand County Road Nos. 134 and 142, between the western end of Potash Lower Colorado River Scenic Byway (Grand County Road No. 279) and Canyonlands National Park) that are east of Canyonlands National Park, south of Dead Horse Point State Park, and other state and private lands north of the Colorado River and west of the Colorado Riverway SRMA, excluding riverside campsites accessible by water craft from the Colorado River.Show citation box

x. Lands located at the southern end of Spanish Valley located on the east and west sides of U.S. Highway 191 to the rim of the valley, south of the San Juan County line to the Kane Springs Creek Canyon Rim Road.

xi. Lands within the Mill Creek Canyon ACEC and the Mill Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area (WSA). Backpack-type camping within the Mill Creek Canyon ACEC and the Mill Creek Canyon WSA is allowed at sites one-quarter mile or farther from designated roads and greater than 100 feet from Mill Creek and archaeological sites.

xii. Lands within Desert Bighorn Sheep lambing areas (46,319 acres) as shown on Map 9 of the Approved Moab RMP.

More details – The BLM – Moab Field Office

1. Final rule: You must not burn wood pallets.

Wood pallets are the wood frames typically used in shipping operations. Burning wood pallets is hazardous to visitors, BLM personnel, wildlife, and livestock because they contain nails that remain behind after the pallets are burned. This rule applies to all lands managed by the Moab Field Office because the hazards are the same regardless of where the pallets are burned.

2. Final rule: You must not camp in archaeological sites posted as closed to camping.

Camping activities destroy fragile archaeological resources and cause irreparable damage. This rule applies throughout the Moab Field Office because of the high density of archaeological sites across the entire region. The definition of archaeological site is found in the “Definitions” section.

3. Final rule: You must not camp in historic sites posted as closed to camping.

Once these rules are finalized, historic sites that are important to the historical record and local and national heritage will be posted as closed to camping. Also, inadvertent trampling from foot traffic and the use of camping shelters causes movement of structures and site features.

4. Final rule: You must not operate a motorized or mechanized vehicle on any route, trail or area not designated as open to such use by a BLM sign, a BLM map, or the Moab Field Office Travel Management Plan.Show citation box

Mechanized and motorized travel across sensitive desert landscapes and off of established routes can damage scenic, cultural, soil, vegetation, and wildlife habitat resources. The final rule limits these modes of travel to designated routes in order to prevent the degradation of the public land resources that draw people to the area.

5. Final rule: You must not gather petrified wood.

In the Moab area, there are two BLM SRMAs where petrified wood can be found exposed on the ground.

6. Final rule: You must not possess or use glass beverage containers.

The potential for broken glass arising from the possession or use of glass beverage containers presents a health and safety hazard to visitors, especially in areas where children and adults are likely to go barefoot.  This final rule applies only to two specific areas that the BLM has determined poses the greatest health and safety risks: The Sand Hill area near the entrance of Arches National Park, where visitors can be harmed by broken glass hidden in the sand; and the Powerhouse/Mill Creek area, a rare swimming hole near the city of Moab, where visitors can be harmed by broken glass in the stream bed.

7. Final rule: You must not camp at a non-designated site.

This final rule applies only to specific geographic areas where dispersed camping is degrading natural, visual, and wildlife resources, and/or causing risks to human health.

8. Final rule: You must not ignite or maintain a campfire at a non-designated site.

Campfires made without a metal fire ring create an increased risk of wildfire, and resulting damage to natural and cultural resources and harm to public health and safety.

9. Final rule: You must not dispose of human waste in any container other than a portable toilet.

Exposure to human waste is a health risk to the public and BLM personnel. The continuous deposition of human waste on or just beneath the surface of the ground—which is largely sand and bare rock in the Moab region—is a risk that is not naturally mitigated.

10. Final rule: You must not gather wood.

Wood gathering depletes an already limited supply of wood that is not readily replaced in the desert environment.

The BLM – Monticello Field Office

1. Final rule: You must not camp in archaeological sites posted as closed to camping.

Camping activities destroy fragile archaeological resources and cause irreparable damage. Although visitors may not intentionally harm archaeological sites when they camp, several activities associated with camping cause inadvertent damage. This rule applies throughout the Monticello Field Office because of the high density of archaeological sites across the entire region. The definition of archaeological site is found in the “Definitions” section.

2. Final rule: You must not enter archaeological sites posted as closed to the public.

Individual archaeological sites are closed on a case-by-case basis due to degradation from increased visitation.

3. Final rule: You must not use ropes or other climbing aids to access archaeological sites.

The use of ropes or other climbing aids to access archaeological sites can cause irreparable damage and it increases visitation and resulting degradation to otherwise rare and inaccessible sites.

4. Final rule: You must not bring domestic pets or pack animals to archaeological sites posted as closed to the public.

Pets and pack animals cause damage to archaeological sites when they paw, dig in, defecate on, and trample fragile structures and artifacts. In order to promote the integrity and longevity of these sites, pets and pack animals are prohibited.

5. Final rule: You must not operate a motorized or mechanized vehicle on any route, trail, or area not designated as open to such use by a BLM sign, a BLM map or the Monticello Field Office Travel Management Plan.

Similar to the Moab area, mechanized and motorized travel across sensitive desert landscapes and off of established routes in the Monticello area damages scenic, cultural, soil, vegetation, and wildlife habitat resources.

6. Final rule: You must not ignite or maintain a campfire within the canyons of the Dark Canyon Special Recreation Management Area or White Canyon Special Recreation Management Area.

Campfires are prohibited within the canyons of the Dark Canyon SRMA because of the canyons’ high density of archaeological resources. Prohibiting campfires will reduce the risk of starting wildfires, which can cause extensive damage to those resources. Also, by prohibiting campfires within the canyons, the BLM will reduce the risk that visitors will remove ancient wood from archaeological sites for fuel. Campfires also are prohibited in the canyon in the White Canyon SRMA because it is a narrow slot canyon in which burning poses significant health and safety risks. In addition, the logjams that people rely on to navigate the canyon are targeted for firewood. By prohibiting campfires within the canyons of these SRMAs, the likelihood of wildfires will be greatly reduced, thereby providing greater protection of human safety, wildlife, livestock, public land resources, and private property.

Dark Canyon Special Recreation Management Area: The Dark Canyon SRMA includes canyon rims and bottoms for Dark Canyon, Gypsum Canyon, Bowdie Canyon, Lean To Canyon, Palmer Canyon, Lost Canyon, Black Steer Canyon, Young’s Canyon, and Fable Valley Canyon. Trailheads and associated parking/camping areas at these canyons are included within the SRMA boundaries.

BLM Justification

These final supplementary rules will not have an annual effect of $100 million or more on the economy. They will not adversely affect in a material way the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or Tribal governments or communities.

They establish rules of conduct for public use of public lands managed by the Moab and Monticello Field Offices in order to protect public health and safety and protect natural and cultural resources on the public lands.

Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

These final supplementary rules are not “major” as defined under 5 U.S.C. 804(2). The final supplementary rules merely establish rules of conduct for public use on a limited area of public lands and will not affect commercial or business activities of any kind.

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

These final supplementary rules will not impose an unfunded mandate on State, local, or Tribal governments in the aggregate, or the private sector of more than $100 million per year; nor will they have a significant or unique effect on small governments.

Executive Order 12630, Governmental Actions and Interference With Constitutionally Protected Property Rights (Takings)

These final supplementary rules do not have significant takings implications, nor are they capable of interfering with Constitutionally-protected property rights.

Executive Order 13132, Federalism

These final supplementary rules will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, the relationship between the Federal Government and the states, nor the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.

Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform

Under Executive Order 12988, the Office of the Solicitor has determined that these final supplementary rules will not unduly burden the judicial system and that they meet the requirements of sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of the Order.

Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination With Tribal Governments

In accordance with Executive Order 13175, the BLM conducted consultation and coordination with Tribal governments in the development of the RMPs, which form the basis for the final rules.

Monticello

The final rules are in accordance with the issues raised in consultation with the Tribes during the RMP planning process.Show citation box

Consultations with Native Americans on the Monticello RMP began in 2003. The Draft RMP/EIS was sent to the Tribes for review and comment on November 5, 2007. Monticello FO received comments from three tribes, the Hopi Tribe, the Navajo Nation, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. Tribal concerns related to the Draft RMP/EIS were focused on the following:

Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use

Under Executive Order 13211, the BLM has determined that the final supplementary rules will not comprise a significant energy action, and that they will not have an adverse effect on energy supplies, production, or consumption.

Author of BLM Rules

The principal author of these supplementary rules is Jason Moore, Supervisory Staff Law Enforcement Ranger, Canyon Country District Office, 82 East Dogwood Avenue, Moab, Utah 84532.

Reposted by Reagangirl.com  2/28/16


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